(via tanomu)

(via tanomu)

(via tanomu)

criminalwisdom:

In World War One false horses were used as camouflage to allow snipers a place to hide in no-man’s land. (Via)

criminalwisdom:

In World War One false horses were used as camouflage to allow snipers a place to hide in no-man’s land. (Via)

sixpenceee:

And here they are:
Thermoception:  Ability to sense heat and cold. Thermoceptors in the brain are used for monitoring internal body temperature.
Proprioception: The sense of where your body parts are located relevant to each other. 
Chronoception: Sense of the passing of time. Your body has an internal clock. 
Equilibrioception:  The sense that allows you to keep your balance and sense body movement in terms of acceleration and directional changes. 
Magentoception:  This is the ability to detect magnetic fields. Unlike most birds, humans do not have a strong magentoception, however, experiments have demonstrated that we do tend to have some sense of magnetic fields. 
Tension Sensors:  These are found in such places as your muscles and allow the brain the ability to monitor muscle tension.
Nociception:  In a word, pain.  This was once thought to simply be the result of overloading other senses, such as “touch”, but it has it’s own unique sensory system.  There are three distinct types of pain receptors: cutaneous (skin), somatic (bones and joints), and visceral (body organs).
SOURCE

sixpenceee:

And here they are:

Thermoception:  Ability to sense heat and cold. Thermoceptors in the brain are used for monitoring internal body temperature.

Proprioception: The sense of where your body parts are located relevant to each other. 

Chronoception: Sense of the passing of time. Your body has an internal clock. 

Equilibrioception:  The sense that allows you to keep your balance and sense body movement in terms of acceleration and directional changes. 

Magentoception:  This is the ability to detect magnetic fields. Unlike most birds, humans do not have a strong magentoception, however, experiments have demonstrated that we do tend to have some sense of magnetic fields. 

Tension Sensors:  These are found in such places as your muscles and allow the brain the ability to monitor muscle tension.

Nociception:  In a word, pain.  This was once thought to simply be the result of overloading other senses, such as “touch”, but it has it’s own unique sensory system.  There are three distinct types of pain receptors: cutaneous (skin), somatic (bones and joints), and visceral (body organs).

SOURCE

(via diy)

nationalfilmsociety:

Dawn of the Planet of the Apes (2014).

movieposteroftheday:

1969 70mm re-launch poster for 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (Stanley Kubrick, USA/UK, 1968)
Art Director: Mike Kaplan
Poster source: Heritage Auctions
“When MGM decided to re-launch the 70mm prints of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey into New York theatres, the studio decided to revamp the ad campaign as well. The film had been in continuous release since April 1968 and due to that popularity, the studio decided it was time to refresh the ads. The two new posters that were created capitalized on the film’s surreal ending and the news that young people were flocking to the film. The tag line, “The Ultimate Trip” was used and the posters were distributed in a campaign in New York City where the posters were “wilded” onto walls, fences, and construction sight barricades.” –Heritage Auctions
“The Star Child image was selected by Kaplan to re-launch Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece in its full 70mm technical presentation, the format in which the film was meant to be experienced by new and returning audiences. Kubrick had placed an embargo on using the Star Child in any publicity so its appearance in print and poster a year after 2001’s premiere was startling, conveying an immediate human dimension to his epic vision. The unprecedented re-launch was enormously successful, and with THE ULTIMATE TRIP slogan, cemented its recognition as a cultural phenomenon.” –Mike Kaplan, The Movie Posters
Happy Birthday Stanley Kubrick, born July 26, 1928

movieposteroftheday:

1969 70mm re-launch poster for 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY (Stanley Kubrick, USA/UK, 1968)

Art Director: Mike Kaplan

Poster source: Heritage Auctions

“When MGM decided to re-launch the 70mm prints of Stanley Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey into New York theatres, the studio decided to revamp the ad campaign as well. The film had been in continuous release since April 1968 and due to that popularity, the studio decided it was time to refresh the ads. The two new posters that were created capitalized on the film’s surreal ending and the news that young people were flocking to the film. The tag line, “The Ultimate Trip” was used and the posters were distributed in a campaign in New York City where the posters were “wilded” onto walls, fences, and construction sight barricades.” –Heritage Auctions

“The Star Child image was selected by Kaplan to re-launch Stanley Kubrick’s masterpiece in its full 70mm technical presentation, the format in which the film was meant to be experienced by new and returning audiences. Kubrick had placed an embargo on using the Star Child in any publicity so its appearance in print and poster a year after 2001’s premiere was startling, conveying an immediate human dimension to his epic vision. The unprecedented re-launch was enormously successful, and with THE ULTIMATE TRIP slogan, cemented its recognition as a cultural phenomenon.” –Mike Kaplan, The Movie Posters

Happy Birthday Stanley Kubrick, born July 26, 1928